Advice

  • Always use clean containers and clean water. It reduces bacterial growth. If there are many bacteria, they block the cut part of the stem and the flower cannot continue its normal life. The flower does not absorb water or the nutrients in it. We recommend washing vases and other containers by hand with chlorine-containing detergents.
  • Before putting flowers that have been out of water for more than 20 – 30 minutes into a vase, cut the stem at an angle with a sharp knife (dip the knife in water before cutting them – this way, air does not enter the capillaries). After cutting the flower stems, immediately put the flowers in water! If you do not put the flower in water, the cut part of the stem can close up in less than a minute.
  • When cutting the stem, do not use scissors – they compress the capillaries.
  • When putting the flowers in a vase, make sure that the leaves are out of the water. The leaves secrete phenol, helping to block the effect of capillaries, preventing the development of buds, and accelerating fading. In addition, leaves are a good growing area for microorganisms.
  • Hard, calcareous water shortens the time of the flower looking fresh. If you live in an area where the water is hard, you can use water softeners or add citric acid to the water.
  • Excess sodium in water is harmful to carnations and roses; excess fluorine is not suitable for gerberas, gladioli, and freesias.
  • Cut flower preservatives (for example ‘Chrysal’) greatly lengthen the lifespan of cut flowers, promote their growth, and slow down the growth of bacteria in the water.
  • When bringing flowers to your home, avoid major changes in temperature. In winter, leave the cold flowers to a chilly room (about 15 degrees) for a while before putting them in a heated room.
  • Never leave flowers in a car or other places that are too hot. If your trip lasts longer than half an hour, ask the florist to put the cut flowers in moist paper. Putting the flowers in the paper properly will make them last significantly longer.
  • Do not leave the flowers in a draught. For example, when transporting them, place them in some paper or cellophane.
  • Make sure that the room is ventilated enough. Cut flowers emit ethylene – a plant hormone that blocks capillaries in large quantities and prematurely decomposes flower cells. In order to avoid excessive concentrations of it, normal air movement is required.
  • The concentration of ethylene is increased by cigarette smoke, exhaust gases, and nearby ripe fruit, especially strawberries, tomatoes, and bananas. Lilies of the Nile, snapdragons, bouvardias, bellflowers, larkspurs, spurges, baby’s-breaths, lilies, carnations, phloxes, and blue throatworts are particularly sensitive.
  • Avoid temperatures below freezing point (0 degrees). Some flower types may die in seconds at this temperature.